Chilton Aircraft


  Tips on making various parts - double click to view large image
Windscreen Development

Below shows the development of the windscreen, essentially this is the racing screen that I think looks most attractive and suits the racy nature of the airframe. This screen overhangs into the cockpit by 1 ½” so one has to be aware of this when exiting the cockpit. Firstly I made a wooden section of the upper fuselage to which I developed the screen shape in alum, then I gave both items to a panel beater who produced the windscreen frame. I then had to make a buck around which the new screen was to be bent, I had the screen made by an outfit in Nottingham at about a cost of £40. Final drilling of the screen should be undertaken with some care and the final riveting of the screen to the frame should be so the screen can expand and contract with the temperature, otherwise cracking will take place from around the rivet holes.
Basic wooden windscreen jig - photo Roy Nerou Alum screen developed to shape fitted to jig - photo Roy Nerou. Screen attachment frame developed to suit screen shape - photo Roy Nerou Screen shape checked against frame - photo Roy Nerou.
Screen shape checked against frame - photo Roy Nerou. Screen shape marked on screen bending buck ready for heating screen material to shape - photo Roy Nerou. New screen bent and cut to shape with holes drilled for attachment to frame - photo Roy Nerou. The screeen parts ready to rivet together - photo Roy Nerou.

Elevator Controls

Below shows the cover at the fin base removed, with dual elevator cables terminating at the elevator kingpost. Also shown is the inspection aperture showing tailskid tension spring.
General view of cover at base of fin - photo Roy Nerou General view of cover at base of fin - photo Roy Nerou. General view of cover removed at base of fin - photo Roy Nerou Alum cover basic shape, retained by screws - photo Roy Nerou.
Aperture at base of fin showing elevator kingpost - photo Roy Nerou. Aperture at base of fin showing elevator kingpost close up - photo Roy Nerou.  Aperture at base of fin showing elevator kingpost, top view - photo Roy Nerou. Top of tailskid with spring attached - photo Roy Nerou.

Cockpit Seat

Below shows general views of the seat back rest, the seat back hinges forward as can be seen, at the top rear of the seat back is an angled piece of wood that is used to spread the load applied to the decking former when the pilot is present. When I received ‘FSV there was a small fire extinguisher mounted on the rear of the seat. The last photo shows the underside of the old seat with the new seat along side.
Seat back rest in normal position - photo Roy Nerou Seat back in normal position - photo Roy Nerou. Seat back hinged forward to give access to storage area or long range tank where fitted - photo Roy Nerou New and old canvas seat showing the underside of the original - photo Roy Nerou.

Centre Section Fairing and Headrest Structure

Below shows the aluminium forward fuselage to centre section fairing, the fairing aft of the rear spar is made from ply, the forward end of the fairing is retained on the underside by being screwed into the bottom longeron. The headrest structure is shown on the decking ready for the attachment of the streamlined alum cover.
View showing alum fuselage to centre section fairing - photo Roy Nerou View showing alum fuselage to centre section fairing, lower front fixing - photo Roy Nerou. Pilots head rest structure - photo Roy Nerou Pilots headrest structure before alum fairing applied retained by screws - photo Roy Nerou.

Wheel trousers

Below shows the three parts that make up the rear trouser, they sit on the jig whilst they are riveted together.
View showing skin clamps holding the central gusset in place - photo Roy Nerou View showing skin clamps holding the central gusset in place - photo Roy Nerou. A very effective home made rivet tool made from Model Engineer magazine plans - photo Roy Nerou. Martin Kaye rivets the rear edge of the trouser - photo Roy Nerou.

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